Weye Feye

Weye Feye
$149.99

In stock

SKU: WEFE1.1/ORA
Wi-Fi remote control for DSLR cameras
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Description

We imagined a Wi-Fi device that put you in total control of your DSLR, allowed you explore and use its powerful functions while expanding your creative mind. Without wires, with instant results and all via an intuitive interface on your preferred smart device. Take control over your DSLR to capture and share your life’s story as it unfolds, wirelessly and without physical contact with your camera. All of this and more, made possible by our intuitive App that bonds to Weye Feye’s own Wi-Fi network. Documenting your life’s story is now easier than ever before.

Technical Specifications

  • Battery: Li-Polymer 3.7V 2100mAh/7.77Wh
  • Dimensions: 87x47x28mm
  • Weight: 90g
  • Materials: ABS, PC, Silicone
  • Wi-Fi Signal: 802.11n

How It Works

Additional Information

  • Control focus, ISO, Aperture and more without touching your camera
  • Powerful photo-bracketing and photo-stacking functions
  • Broad time-lapse options
  • Integrated web server – share your story with friends via web browser
  • Tethering App – See your work on Mac/PC in real time
  • 2100mAh on board battery – 8 hours operational life (draws no power from your camera)
  • Inbuilt 802.11n Wi-Fi router with 80m range
  • Ultra-fast live view - 0.2s latency

Reviews

Write a Review
Further proof your equipment. Fast t...
By Studio McCutch | May 28, 2015 Further proof your equipment. Fast transfer of even raw files from a 5D. Vary happy thank you
Works well as advertised. Two t...
Quality
By Blair H. | May 25, 2015 Works well as advertised. Two things that I found that were not described: Each picture took longer than expected to complete the upload cycle to my device. Secondly, I had both my iPad and iPhone turned on. Both devices picked up the Weye Feye signal, dividing the strength of the wifi signal and the device would not complete it's upload. Solution... Only have one device open when using the Weye Feye and turn off the Wifi on the other. Other than those things I am pleased with the product and would recommend it highly.
I have a Canon T3i Rebel, a...
Quality
By Amazon Customer Since Amazon Sold Only Books "Life is a journey...the destination, enigmatic." | May 19, 2015 I have a Canon T3i Rebel, and LOVE this tool!

I have an iPhone6 and the unit paired up quickly (it's WiFi, not Bluetooth) and hooked up directly to the camera without a hitch. You can use any cable, so long as it has the correct plugs (USB and micro).

It works GREAT! Like magic, it accesses all of the files on your SD Card and you can transfer back and forth on your phone. You can shoot pix from your PHONE--even when you're nowhere near the camera. It's AWESOME!

The unit straps securely to the tripod, and is weather resistant.

It's well made and sturdy, and so far, has had no glitches at all. I love this!
So far it seems to...
Quality
By Vivek Gupta | May 14, 2015 So far it seems to perform quite well and is a good solid competitor to the Camranger at the price point it is offered at currently. The straps built into it are quite nice for attaching to a tripod, very well thought out. Although it doesn't have all the features of the camranger it offers a chance for many more to try out this remote camera control capability that can be great for long exposures and awkward angles setup on a tripod.
A very useful device for most photographers...
Quality
By Chuck Bittner "Disabled comedian & gamer!" | May 09, 2015 A very useful device for most photographers. I tried my hat at wireless photography for using eyeFi cards ( B00TKFEPHA ) Wi-Fi adapters built the new memory cards. I never had much success with them as they get the storage space I desired and the signal was a very strong. But this thing is 1000 times better. Those cards at the time of writing this review were $99 for 32 GB. I'd much rather have this set up with live view. Set up a super easy just download the app and plug it in pretty straightforward.

If you're somebody looking to do animal photography this definitely will help you get your camera closer without scaring your subject. For somebody who's into filming skateboarding or BMX freestyle this can only help you get some spectacular shots.

$149.99 as I'm writing this review this is hands-down my favorite way to remote shoot with your digital SLR cameras. Be sure to check the compatibility list before purchase to make sure your camera is good to go.
I'm an adventure/travel ph...
Quality
By Josh Aldridge | April 21, 2015 I'm an adventure/travel photographer and shoot primarily on the Canon 6D. I got the Weye Feye remote a couple months ago and it hasn't left my side since. I've never been a sissy about laying in dirt/thorns/anthills to get a shot but it's really nice to not have to anymore.

My unit's been dropped a couple times, overworked repeatedly, and stepped on once—it's still going strong.
So far I haven't been able to ...
Quality
By ★★★ Jeri Zerr ★★★ "formerly a Road Warrior of the Nth Degree" | April 20, 2015 So far I haven't been able to get this to work on my T4i so I did further research. I've found 2 different lists on the Weye Feye website, next I'll try this with a 70D which was listed on the 2nd list in the English FAQ but not on the general listing... I've shared the FAQ list below:

1. COMPATIBILITY

Weye Feye is compatible with the following cameras :
CANON

EOS 5Dmll
EOS 5DmIII
EOS 6D
EOS 7D
EOS 40D
EOS 50D
EOS 60D
EOS 70D
EOS 450D
EOS 550D
EOS 600D
EOS 650D
EOS 700D

NIKON

D3s
D3x (Beta)
D4
D90
D300
D300s
D600
D610
D700
D800
D800E
D810
D5100
D5200
D5300
D7000
D7100
Updated/Uprated from one star because now Xs...
Quality
By Js | April 19, 2015 Updated/Uprated from one star because now Xsories.com at last lists compatible cameras on their product page. Go to xsories.com>weye feye: technical specifications.

List of compatible cameras:
CANON

EOS 5Dmll
EOS 5DmIII
EOS 6D
EOS 7D
EOS 40D
EOS 50D
EOS 60D
EOS 70D
EOS 450D
EOS 550D
EOS 600D
EOS 650D
EOS 700D

NIKON

D3s
D3x (Beta)
D4
D90
D300
D300s
D600
D610
D700
D800
D800E
D810
D5100
D5200
D5300
D7000
D7100
Did not work with Nikon D80, but now you can tell in advance. It would be even better if Weye Feye (what a clumsy moniker) also listed these compatible cameras on their Amazon page.

I can't of course, fairly review a product I have not and cannot use, but the star rating jumped up from the cellar because now you know whether yours will.

In the meantime, the excellent April 13, 2015 reviews by Jeff Kraus and the renowned Jerry Saperstein will serve you well. Even better, Jerry includes a list of some compatible cameras and advises you to check the manufacturer's website... which I did and a fat lot of good it did me. Jerry is a forensic kind of guy and obviously a better researcher than I.
I'm an avid user of wireless remote systems ...
Quality
By ScOObydoo | April 17, 2015 I'm an avid user of wireless remote systems - I've used everything from the hacked TP-Link routers with DSLR Controller (Android) to the Hyperdrive iUSBportCAMERA (which is a horrible product BTW). This one is middle of the road as far as price goes, but is one of the more reliable units I've ever tested. The unit itself isn't too well designed as it requires a tripod or other mounting point. Ideally, I prefer units that can go on the top hotshoe (for best reception over Wi-Fi), or have a tripod screw so I can put it on a mount. The unit itself is a small black box with USB in (charger) USB out (to the camera) and the whole thing goes inside a hard yet flexible plastic enclosure. It then attaches with velcro to your tripod or other mount.

Setup is simple - plug into your camera (cable is NOT included, it only comes with MicroUSB for charging), then turn on, and connect using the app. I only tested Android, but on my Nexus 6, it connected just fine, and the app then presented its settings and preview screen.

At $149, it isn't cheap, and if you like to hack, there ARE other ways to do this, but this is the first that just works.

It could use a better mount option, and I wish it came with all the required cables, but other than that, there is nothing that takes it away from the five stars it deserves.
The Weye Feye l...
Quality
By Jeff Kraus | April 12, 2015 The Weye Feye looks to be a solid competitor for wireless control of a dSLR through a phone or tablet. For reference, I shoot primarily with a Canon EOS 5D Mk III and use my iPhone 6 or 3rd generation iPad for remote shooting. I also purchased a CamRanger Wireless Controller a couple of years ago, which is a direct competitor to the Weye Feye, and which I'll be using as a point of comparison throughout the review. So if you're wondering if you should plunk down the extra cash on the CamRanger, hopefully I'll be able to help you decide. If you already know you're not in the market for the CamRanger, you can skip that part of the review and save yourself some time.

Side note: This review is specific to the information I have available to me at the time of the review. These devices are firmware upgradeable, and obviously the apps can also be updated with new features and functionality. I will try to update my review as new features are added and bugs are squashed, but right now my review is current as of 04/13/2015.

== On Its Own ==

Physically, the Weye Feye seems to be pretty well made. The black plastic unit comes surrounded by a flexible orange case that serves as protection from drops and as a connection point for the velcro straps that allow you to mount the unit to a tripod leg. There's a small button on the front that serves as the power button, as well as a battery check button. It's slightly difficult to find in the dark but that's not a big deal.

There are two LEDs on the front, one showing the charge state (green/blue/orange/red to show an approximate battery level, flashing while charging), and the other showing power state. A micro USB port on the side is used for charging (a cable is included for this purpose) and a full-size USB port is on the end for connecting to your camera (cable not included).

Setup is straightforward. After charging the device, turn it on and wait for the lights to settle to a solid green state. Your phone/tablet will see it as a Wi-Fi hotspot. Connect to it. Then connect the Weye Feye to the camera (order is not important here; you can connect to the camera at any time) and turn the camera on. The phone/tablet app will show the name of the camera when the connection is set up correctly. If there is a disconnect, it will tell you where (i.e., if your phone/tablet is not connected to the Weye Feye, or if the Weye Feye is not connected to the camera).

Once the connection is made, you can control the camera or view the contents of the memory card. Controlling the camera from the phone allows you to do the following:

- View a live representation of the camera's viewfinder on your phone or tablet (similar to Live View mode on the camera, but the camera's display is blacked out and the phone/tablet used instead). You won't be getting a perfect 30fps instantaneous display, obviously, since there's going to be some latency involved, but the Weye Feye is surprisingly fast. I'd venture to say that in the vast majority of cases, you'd hardly even notice the delay. It's really quite good in that respect.
- Click on any part of the screen (in AF mode) to focus on that point. The speed with which this happens depends on the lens used and the light level, but will operate at the same speed as using Live View directly from the camera.
- Control many of the camera's exposure features via button overlays on the screen. This includes: drive mode (i.e., single shot, continuous, high speed continuous, quiet mode), exposure compensation, white balance, ISO, and auto or manual focus.
- If manual focus is selected, up and down arrows allow you to incrementally change the focus in small or large steps.
- Set an intervalometer: Set the number of desired exposures and the desired interval between them (in whole seconds). Then tell it whether it should attempt to reacquire focus after every shot, or leave it where it was for the first shot.
- Set a self-timer with any desired delay (in whole seconds)
- Set custom aperture bracketing. You can choose any number of supported aperture values and it will take a photo for each value. They need not be consecutive, so you can for example select f/1.4, f/4, f/10, and f/16 and it will take all four in succession.
- Exposure compensation bracketing, this operates similar to aperture bracketing. They don't need to be consecutive like they would be in-camera. You could set compensation values of -5, +0.6, +4, and +5.
- ISO bracketing, as above.
- White balance bracketing, as above.
- Basic focus bracketing, select 3, 5, 7, or 9 photos with "small", "medium", or "large" focus steps between them.

In the photo view mode, you can look at the images on the camera's memory card, zoom in on them, and share them with various social sites like Facebook or Flickr. I don't really see much of a use for this particular feature though, since I never upload anything without first running it through Photoshop for adjustments. If you don't care to do this, then you may find the sharing functionality to be useful and convenient.

I've had a couple of small problems so far with the use of the Weye Feye.
- the +/- step buttons used for time (such as for the time interval in the intervalometer mode or the self-timer delay) are tedious for large values. For example, if you wanted to set the interval to 30 minutes, you'd be holding down the "+" button for quite some time. This may be specific to iOS, I'm not sure since I have no Android device to test with.
- On a handful of occasions, the connection to the Weye Feye never worked correctly. After connecting to it on the phone, it would still say I wasn't connected to it. This would be resolved by restarting the Weye Feye.
- There's a problem in certain circumstances where the Live View display on the phone/tablet goes black even though the camera still "sees" correctly (ie, it can still focus on an area when you tap the screen, it's just that your screen is black so you don't know what you're focusing on).
- I tried to use the web server functionality, which is supposed to allow you to see the images on the camera's memory card without using the app. I was able to view the gallery page on my laptop, but it didn't have any images on it even though the camera's memory card had several. I haven't yet figured out how to get this feature to work. (Update: it occurred to me recently that maybe the web server functionality doesn't work for RAW files because a browser wouldn't support viewing them. I will retest with JPGs shortly and update the review, but if this is the case, that's going to be a problem for RAW shooters such as myself)
- Documentation is sparse, to say the least. Aside from the most basic connection information, the rest is up to you to figure out on your own. The website offered no additional help, offering only the same skimpy quick start manual as was included in the box. I could find nothing more in-depth than that.

== CamRanger Comparison ==

Okay, so the CamRanger currently weighs in at double the price of the Weye Feye. At first glance, that makes it a no-brainer decision. However, the CamRanger does have some additional features that the Weye Feye currently does not have. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list, especially since the software and firmware updates frequently add new functionality, but some of these features include (keeping in mind my particular setup, your functionality may differ based on your camera model):

- The CamRanger has a replaceable battery.
- Supports real-time viewing by multiple client apps simultaneously (meaning, people can download a view-only client app, and you can allow those people to see, on their own devices, the photos coming off of your camera as you shoot them). Other users CAN connect to the Weye Feye as a basic web server, but it just lets you view the gallery, and at any rate, I could never get the gallery images to show up even though the web server was working.
- Multiple camera support from a single laptop
- Change image mode (i.e., JPG, RAW, JPG+RAW, and the camera-supported size options) is available on the CamRanger, but not on the Weye Feye.
- Same goes for changing the metering mode (i.e., average, spot, center-weighted, etc)
- Live histogram: a continuously updating histogram representation of the live view is a (defeatable, if desired) option on the CamRanger as well as the Weye Feye, but the Weye Feye only has a brightness histogram, while the CamRanger supports a more informative RGB histogram.
- Grid lines can be turned on as an overlay if desired, and the color can be changed to suit taste.
- Highlight and Shadow Clipping: when highlights or shadows are clipped in an image, you have the option to turn on a blinking display that shows you where those clipped areas are in the image.
- Aspect Ratio: another screen overlay that shows you whatever aspect ratio boundaries you set (just an overlay for reference - does not crop the image).
- Focus Peaking: another overlay that shows you, based on your aperture, a red outline around all of the portions of the image that will be in focus when you trip the shutter.
- Supports the use of a motorized tripod head to allow for remote rotation and tilt. This can be incorporated into the intervalometer functionality as well (i.e., automated move-shoot-move-shoot-move-shoot for time-lapse panning).
- Camera Mode thumbnails: As you shoot, thumbnails of the most recent shots are displayed in a filmstrip across the top of the screen while in camera view. The Weye Feye requires that you exit camera mode, enter gallery mode, and click on the folder to see your most recent shots.
- Documentation. It exists for the CamRanger. You can download a PDF file with all the information you need to become an expert on its operation. The Weye Feye has a tiny book with about three paragraphs of useful information on it. I could find nothing more online.

On the other hand, some things that might give Weye Feye the edge:

- Better build. The Weye Feye looks the part, and the protective case is a nice touch. It's easier to mount to the tripod with the velcro, as opposed the the carabiner clip supplied for the CamRanger.
- The CamRanger is slightly larger and heavier, and looks exactly like the TP-Link mobile router that it's based off of.
- Security (entering a password for the Wifi connection) is required for the CamRanger, but can be disabled on the Weye Feye. It's good to have the security to ensure that no one can take control of your camera mid-shoot, but it's also good to be able to turn it off if desired.
- The Weye Feye firmware update process can be completed from your phone by just clicking a button, and then restarting the Weye Feye. The CamRanger requires a software download to a computer connected to the device via Ethernet or Wifi.
- It's half the price.
- The phone screen real estate taken up by the live view is larger for the Weye Feye on my iPhone 6, because for some reason the CamRanger software doesn't let me switch to landscape view when I rotate my phone. This is only a problem with my phone though, because on the iPad I can view the CamRanger software in landscape and portrait mode, and there's a button to expand the live view window to take up the entire iPad screen.

=== Conclusion ===

So I hate to finish up a comparison review with "it depends" because it seems like such a cop-out. However, in this case it really does depend. I could totally see some people not caring about an RGB histogram, real-time client displays, and highlight clipping alerts. Personally, I love the focus peaking feature of the CamRanger, but if I didn't have it, it wouldn't be the end of the world.

Maybe you just need an intervalometer and a few other basic features sported by both units. In that case, by all means save yourself 50% and buy the Weye Feye. But if you think you might want those features, or you're itching to try out the remote control pan/tilt tripod head, you might be better off with the CamRanger.

For me, if I had it to do all over again and I could use both of them before buying... I don't know. From a cost/benefit standpoint I'd probably lean toward the cheaper Weye Feye, only because all of the CamRanger's additional functionality is "nice" for me but not "necessary" since as a hobby photographer I don't have much need for things like client mirroring and on-the-fly display watermarking, and the $150 I save could go toward something I'd get more use out of. On the other hand, I've never had a connection issue with the CamRanger and it does occasionally happen with the Weye Feye where it briefly loses/regains its connection to the phone, even when they're only two feet apart. So the dependability of the CamRanger might be worth some extra cash.

So! Sorry about the (very) wordy review, but I like to be thorough with things like this because there's a lot for prospective buyers to consider. PLEASE feel free to comment on the review if you have any questions that I might be able to answer for you, or if you think I've said anything incorrectly that you'd like me to correct. I promise to try to keep this review updated as new versions of the software and firmware are released.
Works very well. ...
Quality
By Jerry Saperstein | April 12, 2015 Works very well.

I have been searching for a remote monitor solution. I tried a Removu and let me tell you, that’s a device and a company you want to avoid like the plague.

The Xsories Weye Feye, on the other hand, is something of a gem. Not perfect, but it definitely gets the job done without much muss and fuss.

It works with many, but not all, fairly recent Nikon and Canon bodies. Be sure to check the manufacturer’s website if your camera isn’t on this list: Canon 6D,
Canon 450D, Canon 50D, Canon 7D, Canon 5D II, Canon 60D, Canon 650D, Canon 600D, Canon 5D III, NikonD5100, Nikon D600, Nikon D7000, Nikon D300, Nikon D700 ,Nikon D300s, Nikon D800 and Nikon D90.

Also, make sure you have the USB cable that came with your camera!

Installation takes seconds. The iOS or Android app gives you control of the following functions: ISO, white balance, aperture, metering, etc;, switching between photo, video or time lapse, focus (manual or automatic) and image capture.

The manufacturer goes on to describe the display and sharing functions: “The Gallery will allow you to view, select and share the images from the smartphone or tablet directly to a computer or via social networks and sharing platforms. The integrated server allows several users to access the Gallery without installing the App.”

None of this is hyperbole. It’s all accurate and, best of all, it works.

The retaining straps are a little on the flimsy side, but still quite usable.

My only regret is that this doesn’t work with GoPros or even smaller bodied mirrorless cameras like the Sony RX series.

A terrific device at a very reasonable price.
Im a filmmaker and if ...
Quality
By Marbella | April 11, 2015 Im a filmmaker and if you're looking for a field monitor this is one of the best options you can use your tablet , phone or computer and transfer your files which is much better than just a monitor
It works... operation, once connected seem...
Quality
By DK | December 14, 2014 It works... operation, once connected seems very stable. I would have liked an indication of signal strength either on the unit or the app.
Transfer of RAW images takes longer than I would like... but transferring JPEGs is fast enough for my purposes. The printed instructions are not very well done. The IOS app is OK. Live viewing of what the camera sees is good. Response to shutter release is good. The price is very reasonable. The straps use to attach the unit to other objects is barely acceptable.. but.. that is a small complaint. A few minor changes and this could be a 5 star item.

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